Moving towards Regenerative Capitalism

Moving towards Regenerative Capitalism

Studies show that implementation of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will open up $12T in new market opportunities.  As society looks to the private sector to advance solutions to climate change, toxic pollution, environmental racism and economic instability, the SDGs create a platform to positively mobilize the forces of capitalism to address these challenges.
 
Who is going to position themselves to best capture these opportunities?  Alexandra McPherson co-teaches a PMBA class for the University at Buffalo’s School of Management, “Sustainability as a Business Strategy” to address that very question for emerging leaders.  Students learn about the rise of SDGs and sustainability metrics in corporate management and responsible investment. It builds on forums Niagara Share has co-hosted, such as our session with Vincent Stanley of Patagonia, Fred Keller of Cascade Engineering and John Fullerton of the Capital Institute on re-thinking capitalism. And our symposium with UB RENEW hosting Bill Ford on his vision for mobility and other thought leaders on why places like Buffalo and Detroit are well positioned to lead in this space. 

 

Redefining Success in the Marketplace

Redefining Success in the Marketplace

“Dollar Tree is a case where we felt it was also an issue of social justice,” says Alexandra McPherson, a project manager for the Investor Environmental Health Network, an investor collaborative that encourages companies to join the project. “Are people who can’t afford organic products inadvertently being sold the most toxic ones?” Alessandra Bergamin, Dollar Stores Moving to Remove Dangerous Plastics from Their Shelves, National Geographic

Alexandra McPherson, Principal for Niagara Share is managing the Investor Environmental Health Network (IEHN) for Clean Production Action. IEHN is a membership-based, investor collaborative that promotes the use of safer chemicals to enhance shareholder value, public health, and the environment. IEHN recognizes that a company’s brand reputation, public trust, and market share are linked to the environmental and human health risks and safety of its products. Through direct corporate engagement IEHN members advance solutions and strategies to transform business practices through strategic tools and partnerships that include the Chemical Footprint Project.  IEHN’s work to establish the Chemical Footprint Project as the gold standard for chemical management is parallel to the investment community’s leadership to reduce carbon risk in the marketplace. Please see recently published articles and reports below:

Sustainable Material Innovation for Clean Energy

Sustainable Material Innovation for Clean Energy

"A collaboration between the Collaboratory for a Regenerative Economy (CORE), Niagara Share, Clean Production Action, and the Department of Materials Design and Innovation at the University of Buffalo, the participants explain the goal is to use AI and machine learning tools to accelerate the material discovery phase for lead-free perovskite solar cells and perfluorooctanoic-acid-free encapsulants." Doughnuts are the New Green, Becky Beetz at PV Magazine 

Renewable, clean energy from photovoltaics (PV) and other clean energy technologies will be essential to a powering a just and sustainable energy future. The dire consequences of climate change to vulnerable peoples and species around the world make a successful PV industry an imperative. But there are concerns about the use of novel materials that are harmful to human health and the environment during production and end of life management.  With the University at Buffalo's Department of Materials Design and Innovation (MDI) and Clean Production Action (CPA), Niagara Share is accelerating the development of solutions for clean, safe, and cost-effective sustainable energy technologies. Elements of Change: Moving forward together toward a cleaner, safer future outlines our work to empower stakeholders with science and date-driven tools to reduce the chemical material footprint of the renewable energy sector and its supply chains. Please see recently published articles below: